Entry 9

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
Entry 8

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
Entry 7

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
Entry 6

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
Entry 5

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
ENTRY 4

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
ENTRY 3

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
Entry 2

Not that anyone should be surprised that Arabic should prove such a poetic medium in which to express the meanings of football or that its public should be so receptive to its rhythms: the language  has a rich literary tradition of exaggeration and hyperbole, of tall tales that can render the every day epic and that remains a demotic, popular appea

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Sophie Feller
Entry 1

Faris Awad’s ecstatic poem celebrating Sergio Augero’s last minute title-winning goal for Manchester City in 2012 was composed on the spot. Forgive me, but there is no way in print, but by typological feint, to render the cadences and intensity of Awad’s brilliant commentary for Al-Jazzera. Don't take my word for it though, listen for yourself.

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Sophie Feller